Saturday
13 October 2012
41 Comments

“On Landscape” – A New Photography Magazine

What the hell I’ve been doing for the last couple of months!!!

Well I can finally tell everyone what it is I’ve been doing for the last few months. In short, Joe Cornish and I have set up a company that is creating a Britain oriented, online landscape photography magazine. In long, it’s something I’ve been thinking about doing for the last two years and have been actively researching for the last nine months. It started whilst I was out in the Hebrides with David Ward and we were talking about the direness of much of the photographic press and especially it’s landscape photography coverage. This, and multiple other conversations, convinced me that the photographic press can never have great landscape photography coverage. The reason for this is that they are beholden to their advertisers and this means that they have to create content that attracts users who are buying stuff. This stuff is either new photographers, photographers who are upgrading their equipment or photographers buying gadgets/tours/workshops etc. There is no incentive to cater for photographers who have ‘good enough’ equipment and who maybe have moved on to trying to work on their composition/art. In fact, they know that the majority of photographers only buy photography magazines for a couple of years and so there is no point continuing to create new content, so they just recycle the old content on a two year basis. Oh they might throw in the odd ‘interesting’ sideline (witness David Ward’s articles in Photographer Monthly). Amateur Photographer seems the only magazine that is willing to go out on a limb and throw some real curveballs (a recent treatise on Petzval lens construction for example).

Anyway – I rant. The answer was to plan something myself, something with that uses the advantages that the web has to offer (and that I have enough knowledge to make the most of). The following months saw me getting to know Joe Cornish through a couple of courses and finally being asked by him to develop a new website. The website has taken a while to sort out through no fault on either of our parts but whilst getting to know each other, the idea inevitably got talked about and I was pleasantly surprised to find out that Joe saw the potential in the project too. So, we bashed heads and put together a plan where we could both contribute aspects that were of equal value and the company Landscape Media Ltd was registered and the ‘Great British Landscapes’ magazine was conceived. Unfortunately, I had a full time job and an employer that I had a lot of respect for and so the planning went on the back burner, tinkering with approaches and styles, etc.

In the end, I had to make a decision on whether the project was going to proceed and, after a supportive phone call with my wife, we decided to go ahead with things full time (well, almost full time – I’m working for my wife’s company for a couple of days a week and we’re incubating the project). This was three months ago and since then I’ve been clearing out some work (witness the Light and Land website going live for instance) and sorting out the business end of things and for the last two months it’s been full on researching and developing the project. Thing’s came together a couple of weeks ago where we were in a position to organise a launch date. The 18th of October will see free issue as a taster for everybody with content from a location guide of a popular Yorkshire gritstone outcrop through a technical offering on dealing with shooting into the sun and also a couple of screencasts from Joe Cornish with two never before seen pictures.

The website will be subscription based, or more properly, it will be a ‘freemium’ website. For those who haven’t come across this term, it’s seems fairly unique to the internet, it means that some of the content will be free and there will be a subscription fee for ‘premium’ content. The content that will be free won’t all be immediately free. Some of it will be but some other bits will be ‘delayed free’, in other words it will be free after a couple of months but subscribers will be able to see this content immediately. So subscribers will get ‘the full monty’ whereas others will get what will be a large range of well written content but maybe they’ll have a wait for a while for some of it.

So what ‘sort’ of content are we going to be producing? Well, obviously with a name like ‘Great British Landscapes’ it’s going to be British oriented. However, this doesn’t mean that it won’t be relevant for non-brits, a lot of the content will be nationality neutral. There will be an ‘issue’ every two weeks and each issue will include a location guide, an extended article on craft or art, a screencast or interview and a couple of reviews of books/websites or other photographic material. There will also be extracts and highlights from the web, hopefully such that you can pick up GBL and it will provide enough links to get the most out of the internet without taking you away from the real work (photography, if you hadn’t guessed).

Sooo – if you’re interested (I really hope you are) and might possibly be subscribing (I really hope you do!) then hop on over to Great British Landscapes and add your email to the box (and you might win a years subscription!). If you’re the sort of person who does that social media thang, you can also follow what’s happening by like’ing http://www.facebook.com/landscapegb or following @landscapegb (if you want to follow my personal tweets, try @timparkin).

Oh, and if you’re around Bradford on the 16th of October, Joe and I are giving the keynote speech for a photography conference at the National Media Museum and we’d love to have you (although you’ll have to pay and check there are tickets left of course – http://www.exposureleeds.org/photocamp).

Finally – what does this mean for this blog, well I’ll still be writing in it although it will probably become a ‘behind the scenes’ blog and I may be moving the whole website over to www.onlandscape.co.u (something like http://www.onlandscape.co.uk/timparkin). When I write stuff that might make sense to have a wider audience, it will be posted in On Landscape. We’re also including a few extra writers for regular features, including a special guest for the first issue.

We both really want this to reflect what the landscape photography community want and as such we’re really interested in your ideas as well so comment away…

Comments (skip to bottom)

41 Responses to ““On Landscape” – A New Photography Magazine”

  1. On October 12, 2010 at 9:19 pm Paul Owen responded with... #

    Excellent!!!!!!! All the best with this venture.

  2. On October 12, 2010 at 10:03 pm Robert Teague responded with... #

    I’m not bothered by the site being British oriented, even though I live on the opposite of the globe (Hawaii). In fact, I’m looking forward to seeing the site evolve over time, and looking forward to reading and seeing more work by Joe Cornish (one of my favorite photographers). Keep up the great work, and I wish you the greatest success.

  3. On October 12, 2010 at 10:12 pm david langan responded with... #

    Sounds excellent Tim, cant wait to see the first issue !! If it is the antithesis of the monthly photographic press (though I agree that AP can be pretty good!) then I am sure it will be a success for the landscape tog who is after something a bit more than harsh PP and the same basic stuff churned out again and again

    Wishing you every success

    dave

  4. On October 12, 2010 at 10:40 pm Michael Marten responded with... #

    Whilst I’m not a brilliant landscape photographer, this seems to me to be a great idea – I haven’t bought photo magazines for years (except AP from time to time), and it’s clever to launch something that will not be so dependent on advertisers.

    Do you have information on subscription rates available somewhere that I haven’t yet seen?

  5. On November 4, 2010 at 9:16 am Sam Gibbons responded with... #

    Hi Tim,

    This is fab news ! I look forward to visiting the site when its up and running.

    Goodluck with this new venture

    All the best

    Sam

  6. On November 6, 2010 at 11:05 am David Mantripp responded with... #

    I’ve looked throught the first issue, and although I think it is very well put together, and the content is very high quality, I’m left with a feeling that you’re boxing yourselves in a bit with the "British" part. For a start, a number of the photographers you cite as examples of the directions you’re interested in are not British, and quite possibly would not have created the impact they have made if they had been. Secondly, although the British landscape has many qualities, frankly it has been done to death, and although it isn’t their fault, the cloning of the styles of Cornish, Ward, Noton, Waite and other leading names has unfortunately diluted the message. I’m not sure how you are going to give a fundamentally different message than the massively cliched beach+cliff+distant castle shot with screaming SHOOT GREAT LANDSCAPES headlines which the glossy UK monthlies churn out every month, without opening up to wider input and wider influences. For example, it would be interesting – maybe- to see how foreign landscape photographers interpret the British landscape. And also how, say, Charlie Waite’s interpretation of Tuscany compares to that of a local photographer.

    I’m sure there is a huge potential audience for this publication, but I would encourage you to not set such restrictions, but to be more the home of intelligent, British-school landscape photography on the global, world wide web.

    As it stands, and as an example of a (nominally) British photographer living abroad, who is unlikely ever to photograph a British landscape, I’m not very compelled to hit the subscribe button, save to encourage a brave and worthy venture.

  7. On November 6, 2010 at 10:49 pm Tim Parkin responded with... #

    The magazine is going to be British oriented in that the location guides will be British, the majority of the photographers featured are going to be British and if I’m reviewing books and shows I will be prioritising British ones.

    The rest of the content is as applicable to a foreign landscape photographer as it is to a British one. The art of composition, philosophy of land, craft of image creation, techniques of post-processing are all universal.

    I’m also hoping to make the magazine as widespread in style as possible, for every Noton there will be a Nadolski, for every Ward a Friel, for every Waite a Norfolk. The only reason we see the same style again and again is that it is on the one hand, the most easily accessible and on the other hand, far too easy for the magazines to churn out again and again. One of the reasons for the magazine is to push against this commoditizing of photography.

    How am I "going to give a fundamentally different message than the massively cliched beach+cliff+distant castle shot with screaming SHOOT GREAT LANDSCAPES headlines"? Well, simple – don’t give that message. Feature Southam, Norfolk, Nadolski, Friel, Cooper, Hughes (and of the last, take a look at Nicholas Hughes!). People like Peter Scammel and Rob Hudson, Mario Popham are doing something interesting with landscape photography. In the classic vein, people like Neil Bryce and Roger Longdin have original ways of seeing.

    There is a huge scope within the context of ‘British oriented’ – and this doesn’t preclude foreign photographers interpretations of the UK, not does it preclude British photographers interpretations of foreign lands.

    The key word to remember is ‘oriented’ – this precludes nothing. Give me some suggestions of content you would like to see that would compel you and I’ll see what I can do :-)

  8. On November 7, 2010 at 11:55 am Tony responded with... #

    Why criticise mainstream photography magazines? Mainstream photography magazines make money from giving its readers what they want. So cliched samey landscapes are the staple of these magazines because people want it. But over the course of a year, less obvious photographic styles will be covered. There is more of a balance than you think.

    Your ‘2 year’ interpretation of peoples reading habits of the photography magazine is wrong. A lot of beginners, amateurs, enthusiasts read these magazines and after 2 years, or a period of time particular to them they will want to move on to other material from the wide variety of magazines available. That’s because they are developing their photography (not because the magazines are boring/samey, even if this is the reason given for changing reading habits). It’s the variety of other magazines that draw people away.

    All magazines go round in cycles in some way because there is a finite amount of material for the target audience at any one time. The same will apply to your venture even if you don’t realise this yet.. There is nothing wrong or negative about this.

    Cornish, Noton, Waite et al have made a living from producing the same half dozen compositions applied to different locations. Their style is the same clichéd samey style that you complain is featured endlessly in magazines, and copied endlessly, relentlessly and extraordinarily competently on file sharing sites. Anthony Spencer and Adam Burton being very competent carbon copyists.

    Given your absolute dismissal of certain styles of outdoor photography, and your hitching up with a traditional landscape photographer who doesn’t push boundaries, how exactly will you be different from existing magazines? There is nothing different so far from conventional magazines, except traditional magazines have more content. (issue one…LPOTY…yawn…JC processing an image….yawn.) there is actually nothing wrong with the content, except I can get more for less from the stands of WHSmiths.

    I know I will be flamed for this, but so far you have been preaching to the converted, but they will not pay the mortgage. You need to convince people like me why I should pay to watch Joe Cornish spend the best part of an hour processing an image that would take 10 minutes max to process in reality. (How does this differ from practical photography, for example)

    A point to note…You refer to some photographers by referring to their surnames only. Not everyone will be familiar with these names, so googling them may throw up a photographer that is not the one you are referring to. Full names should be quoted, if not website names.

    Tony

  9. On November 7, 2010 at 12:43 pm Tim Parkin responded with... #

    Why criticise mainstream photography magazines? Mainstream photography magazines make money from giving its readers what they want. So cliched samey landscapes are the staple of these magazines because people want it. But over the course of a year, less obvious photographic styles will be covered. There is more of a balance than you think.

    I don’t criticise the magazines individually, I criticise their homogenity en masse. Of course there will be the odd exception, but I personally want a magazine which has this as a rule rather than an exception, which features amateur photographers on a regular basis, which goes into depth both technically and artistically. Will I manage it? I don’t know – but trying is a bit part of it and having an alternative business model will hopefully allow an alternative approach to content

    Your ‘2 year’ interpretation of peoples reading habits of the photography magazine is wrong.

    I’ve been told exactly this by two different magazine staff members and it’s been repeated through acquaintances.

    A lot of beginners, amateurs, enthusiasts read these magazines and after 2 years, or a period of time particular to them they will want to move on to other material from the wide variety of magazines available. That’s because they are developing their photography (not because the magazines are boring/samey, even if this is the reason given for changing reading habits). It’s the variety of other magazines that draw people away.

    Which other material?

    All magazines go round in cycles in some way because there is a finite amount of material for the target audience at any one time. The same will apply to your venture even if you don’t realise this yet.. There is nothing wrong or negative about this.

    I respectfully disagree – they will only go in cycles if they ‘run out of content’ – why should they run out of content unless there are ‘business specific’ limitations on the style and type of content they write about? I personally don’t plan on repeating content – I plan on building on content. If I revisit a topic, I’ll make sure I write more about it. If I talk to a photographer again, I’ll approach things from a different angle, write different questions.
    As far as I’m concerned, if I start to regurgitate the same old content in two years time, that will be a negative thing and I would hope should that happen, I get called on it!

    Cornish, Noton, Waite et al have made a living from producing the same half dozen compositions applied to different locations. Their style is the same clichéd samey style that you complain is featured endlessly in magazines, and copied endlessly, relentlessly and extraordinarily competently on file sharing sites. Anthony Spencer and Adam Burton being very competent carbon copyists.

    I’m afraid this shows a real lack of understanding of these photographers portfolios. Yes is a certain composition style that I think you are referring to but this is far from being a major component of these photographers output. I’m not going to go into detail as it’s pretty pointless – however this sort of comment is said so often that it is probably worth a full on ‘rebuff’ at some point.
    Out of interest, can you let me know which ‘non cliched’ photographers you would prefer to see that represent the best of British photography?

    Given your absolute dismissal of certain styles of outdoor photography,

    Could you expand, I can’t remember absolutely dismissing certain styles of outdoor photography

    and your hitching up with a traditional landscape photographer who doesn’t push boundaries, how exactly will you be different from existing magazines?

    Joe is possibly traditionalist because he is part of the origins of that tradition yes, however it’s wrong to suggest that Joe’s personal photographic style will blinker the magazine in any way. Do you think someone like Michael Kenna just likes long exposure, square, black and white photography (to completely stereotype a fantastic photographer)? Joe has particularly eclectic tastes, and my tastes are only just developing – who is to say what influence this will have on the magazine

    There is nothing different so far from conventional magazines, except traditional magazines have more content. (issue one…LPOTY…yawn…JC processing an image….yawn.) there is actually nothing wrong with the content, except I can get more for less from the stands of WHSmiths.

    Well – I disagree. Having counted the amount of landscape photography coverage (page by page) in the main magazines I can safely say that there will be more content of greater depth here. If you disagree, what can I do?

    I know I will be flamed for this, but so far you have been preaching to the converted, but they will not pay the mortgage. You need to convince people like me why I should pay to watch Joe Cornish spend the best part of an hour processing an image that would take 10 minutes max to process in reality. (How does this differ from practical photography, for example)

    erm.. firstly we’ve only had one issue (two now?) and we’re gradually adding content and this will be influenced by our subscribers/readers – if you want to see a certain type of content, then suggest it. As for ‘how does it differ from practical photography?’, well – I haven’t seen in depth coverage of post processing of this type (if you don’t want to spend that long on a single picture, then good for you. Some people do. We’ll feature other photographers who work differently in future issues).

    A point to note…You refer to some photographers by referring to their surnames only. Not everyone will be familiar with these names, so googling them may throw up a photographer that is not the one you are referring to. Full names should be quoted, if not website names.

    Gem Southam, Simon Norfolk, Andrew Nadolski, Chris Friel, Thomas Joshu Cooper, Nicolas Hughes, Peter Scammel, Rob Hudson, Mario Popham, Neil Bryce, Roger Longdin, Jon Brock, Liza Dracup, etc..
    I’m not quite sure what you are saying in total. Are you trying to suggest that the current crop of landscape photography magazines are all we need? If not, are you suggesting that there is no way that me and Joe can deliver something of interest? Are you suggesting that we could be doing something really good but we’re ignorant of many great landscape photographers? Please suggest what you think we should be doing and what you would do differently..

  10. On November 7, 2010 at 5:09 pm Tony responded with... #

    What am I saying overall? That there is a demand for what you describe as ‘homogeneity en masse’, and that content is more varied on the shelves generally. Shop around.

    As for your publication….of course there is room for more, it’s just that your reasons (IMO) seem to be a little flawed. But there is relatively little outlay so go for it, nothing to lose and all that…..But issue one was a little empty in content and for my taste, a tad mainstream in content. It personally wouldn’t convince me to part with 3 pounds for issue two, and as such would be a poor advert for what I may get if I stumbled across your site looking for a more enlightened photography publication.

    I know its only one edition, but the free to view stuff is one way that people will decide whether to jump in or not.

    You also sound a bit angry. Even before my post. That might put people off.

    Tony

  11. On November 7, 2010 at 5:35 pm Tim Parkin responded with... #

    I can’t really reply because you’re not really saying anything. If you are giving me business advice, then please carry on. Although telling me things don’t satisfy you in particular isn’t going to help.

    If you are not interested then don’t buy/read, you are obviously one of the many who are happily served by the existing magazines/websites, etc. We’re not aiming to satisfy every single landscape photographer in Britain (just as the current publications don’t), we’re just trying to provide what we think is a missing aspect in current periodicals.

    What I don’t understand is that if you have so very little interest, why are you spending so long commenting on my website? I’m starting to think you may be a troll… Prove that you aren’t and give us some useful advice on the sorts of content you want to read.

  12. On November 7, 2010 at 6:56 pm Tony responded with... #

    I was responding to your questions, that’s all. You asked a lot of questions and I chose a couple to answer.

    I am not a troll, just because I disagree with you doesn’t automatically make me a troll. You have my email address so you are free to contact me privately if you want. If you do though, prepare for a robust and brutally honest response.

    I am assuming that you do not actually want me to answer any of your questions.

    I actually read your comments last year about LPOTY, and started to agree with you until you said something along the lines of a picture with a trolley in it cannot be a landscape picture….then the post went off the rails a bit….

    Then I read this post which I totally disagreed with and as you are very vocal in an open forum I decided to comment, particularly as I have my own firm views about landscape photography.

    So that’s it.

    Not a troll.

    Not trying to tell you how to run your business.

    Not going to reply to a post ever again on your website.

    Tony

  13. On November 7, 2010 at 7:11 pm Tim Parkin responded with... #

    I’m still waiting for some useful advice. So far you have posted comments…

    Telling me magazines sometimes have interesting content and naturally have cycles and they’re OK
    Calling Cornish, Noton, Waite cliched (having "the same half dozen compositions applied to different locations").. Insulting Spencer and Burton as carbon copyists.
    Criticising the content of the magazine so far, saying it’s boring and not worth the price.
    Telling me my reasons for starting the business are flawed. Telling me the magazine content was ‘empty’ and too ‘mainstream’ and a ‘poor advert’
    Telling me I’m angry
    Telling me my previous blog posts were off the rails..

    I’d be happy to have ‘answers’, I just haven’t seen any yet..

  14. On January 10, 2011 at 6:08 am Colin Griffiths responded with... #

    Good luck with the venture, it is a great idea. I couldn’t agree more with the opening paragraph of your post.

  15. On January 10, 2011 at 6:24 am Paul Moon responded with... #

    Well done Tim and Joe and hope everything goes to plan. Looking forward to seeing the results.

  16. On January 10, 2011 at 8:12 am Tim responded with... #

    Good choice. A couple of times this summer I’ve perused the supermarket magazine racks and thought the proportion of the paperwork I’m going to read doesn’t justify the cost, in any magazine, and the chances are my time would be better spent getting out there and making photographs.

    So, good idea, good luck from me :)

  17. On January 10, 2011 at 9:20 am Max A Rush responded with... #

    Hi Tim, just came across this and found it very interesting. In particular your ideas about the shortcomings of the landscape photography press sound very convincing and help explain doubts I’ve had about the content of photography magazines for a while. It’s not that the artwork itself is necessarily poor, it’s that the articles always seem to be aimed at the same level of readership with little to interest the more serious and advanced practitioners. I was surprised to find more than one new-looking landscape photography magazine in WH Smiths a few days ago, but couldn’t quite decide what it was I didn’t like about them. I think what it was is that as a professional, I don’t need to read magazines to tell me what to do, but it might be nice to have a forum where professionals and serious amateurs can share their thoughts on inspiration and the art in general and perhaps show some work that they are truly proud of rather than that which simply conforms perfectly with conventional magazine aesthetics. Of course a little about useful practicalities and technical concepts that don’t question the integrity of the reader’s own artistic vision are good too.
    Anyway, I like the sound of this, and if you’re ever interested in featuring anything about the London end of British landscapes, I know someone who might be able to help. In any case I look forward to seeing it in 4 days.
    Max

  18. On January 10, 2011 at 9:38 am Derek Fogg responded with... #

    It would be nice to think that one of my opening posts on my British Landscapes Photography blog http://britishlandscapes.wordpress.com/2010/01/ contributed to the initiative for this project the disappointment for me his that yet again charges need to be made.

  19. On January 10, 2011 at 3:06 pm Julian responded with... #

    Hi Tim,

    Good luck with this. Sounds liek a great idea!

    Just wondering if it’s just going to be articles by Joe, yourself and the odd guest contributor or will there be room for more interactive content (e.g. a forum)?

  20. On January 10, 2011 at 7:35 pm Charles Twist responded with... #

    That’s very brave on your part and I wish you well.

    My only thought is that I would recommend a strong variety of approaches and topics. Different philosophical and artistic attitudes, various capture methods (digital, film, glass plate, whatever), colour and b&w, soft and sharp lenses. There are many ways of treating the landscape as a subject.

    Best regards,
    Charles

  21. On January 10, 2011 at 9:01 pm Rob Friel responded with... #

    Excellent news! Let’s hope there is the space for this to be successful and that it provides something beyond the usual magazine articles which only ever address the basics!

  22. On February 10, 2011 at 2:00 pm David responded with... #

    Splendid news. Looking forward to it, and I trust that it’ll be a success. Personally, I’m interested in the philosophical and artistic attitudes (as quoted from above).

    In a similar vein, I was fortunate to meet the mighty David Ward at his South Bank exhibition and learnt a great deal in the 15 minutes or so.

  23. On March 10, 2011 at 4:49 am Juraj Jakubik responded with... #

    Hi Tim and Joe,

    thanks for such a great idea. Cannot wait to see the first issue and to subscribe, even if I am not living in Britain. I have been waiting for this sort of magazine, talking about photography, not about gadgets and equipment, magazine that can hopefully move my photography forward. Good luck. JJ

  24. On March 10, 2011 at 12:43 pm adamp responded with... #

    Excellent news Tim and I too would like to wish you and Mr JC good luck with this venture! I like the way that the cable release on the website resembles a fishing hook to catch new readers – very clever! Interesting though that you intend to focus (!!!) on UK locations – though I can imagine several reasons for this. A few years ago (the same year as that Hebrides tour I think) I had long philosophical conversations with Niall Benvie and the topic turned to one UK photo mag which we both thought could do better if they included more on European locations – or even further afield. However, though that mag has kept to its UK-centric policy it is still going strong. But I believe that it has run out of steam over the last few years and like so many others is becoming repetitive and has dumbed down to a lower common denominator.

    Allowing extra-UK locations and contributions would not be a bad thing and would open up the possibility of European photo artists showing us how they work – their approach is often different and certainly their wildlife photos seem much more artistic rather than being simply descriptive. Perhaps the same is true in Landscape and it would be good to see that. From images I have seen in a French and German mag, we would gain from their approach.

    The British photo press – but much of European press too – has little if any philosophical and artisitic discussions; perhaps the medium is not as well suited to this as on-line fora and blogs. I believe that many of your readers enjoy reading and contributing your blog (as well as that of that other well known Landscape LF tog) and I hope that the magazine continues that very stimulating and thought provoking activity. Such discussions certainly have helped me to develop my photo thinking. Best wishes, Adam

  25. On March 10, 2011 at 7:21 pm Steve Terry responded with... #

    Good luck with this, Tim. I shall be watching with interest!

  26. On March 10, 2011 at 10:29 pm David O responded with... #

    Looking forward to it. Very bored with off the shelf mags but Ag still holds my interest and, at quarterly, doesn’t come often enough in my view.

    Just in time for your annual rant, sorry, I meant critical appreciation.. of Take-a-View which surely must be out some day soon!

    Will be very interested to see the format of your first issue.

    Best of luck with the new venture.

    Rgds

    David

  27. On May 10, 2011 at 7:31 am Mark Hughes responded with... #

    Hi Tim,
    I recently sent some comments to you via your contact us. I mentioned something of a similar vein in my. Stumbling comments! I feel there is also a great deal of opportunity for more informative web based video clips too, something you have started to do with Joe on your site. I would really welcome video content on your new venture – perhaps a short location type shoot?
    Matt Lauder from Australia has used web techniques to good effect for a pro photographer and may confirm some ideas you may already have.
    Good luck to both of you on this new and exciting venture. I am really looking forward to seeing the fruits of your labour!
    Mark

  28. On May 11, 2011 at 11:10 am Janreinze responded with... #

    Awesome… Love your article here… I may not be an expert critic but I can feel that you did great in this one…By the way, Just want to tell you that is one of the bests websites for photographers that I have ever checked. Thanks for the post.

  29. On June 10, 2011 at 12:53 pm Chris responded with... #

    Best wishes for the new magazine. Great idea, and cannot agree enough that magazines on the shelves of the newsagents are full of the same content or half full of advertising.
    However, Im a little disappointed that you will include digital photography, rather than keep it exclusively for film photography. Film is dying enough, it needs the support and marketing of film photographers to confirm to those who are perhaps starting the art that film is a great and valid option. It also has its real benefits of teaching users to get their images correct at capture and not to rely of PS corrections. We all know that digital has taken over, and the web is full of content that I have to be honest is rubbish, and not photography at all but digital manipulation. I speak with enough digital users over the web or read their comments, its all about pixels, plugins and actions, and I have to be honest, PS manipulation and corrections are far to prevelant. Photography has always been about creating an emotional response or sharing a message etc, but these days digital photography, especially with regards to the landscape, has become a tool to ruin and cartoon the natural world. Theres no need for it when we can get it right, all the time, in the camera. Mr Cornish seems to also have turned his back on film in favour of the digital medium. Maybe a £12000+ camera can capture the landscape better than those who have a their sub £2k systems, but Mr Cornish in his books and many articles has always believed in film, supported it, and said why change when the 5×4 format he already uses gives him the results hes happy with? What a change of mind these days!
    I dont understand why anyone wants to use a digital camera, the results just dont compare to film, especially even more so with the larger formats. It must be either laziness, the desire to cheat or give oneself the room for error. I dont agree or believe its cost or the benefits of instant development and ease of use.

  30. On July 10, 2011 at 10:47 am Douglas Griffin responded with... #

    Wishing you both the very best of luck with this, Tim.
    From what I’ve seen of it so far it looks very promising and it sounds like it will fill a very clear niche in the market for photographers looking to do more with what they have already, without the over-emphasis on post-processing techniques that seems to fill most magazines that I pick up in the shops and then put down again fairly quickly. Doug.

  31. On July 10, 2011 at 7:23 pm Michela G responded with... #

    Have been dipping into your blog etc since your site came up a while back on a search for Schneider loupe!! Sad eh? Latest news is very welcome – I’ve been pondering the dire state of photography journalism for a while and when prompted by Mr Ephraums to consider Vision & Style felt there was much more that could be done. The only thing worse than the deteriorating content is their tendency to publish letters from readers saying how their mag is the best thing since sliced bread. Good luck and I shall keep an eye on developments.

    Michela

  32. On August 10, 2011 at 8:00 am Michael Paynton responded with... #

    Hi Tim, Fantastic! I hope this venture really takes off, I’m sure it will!

    Best wishes,

    Michael.

  33. On August 10, 2011 at 6:13 pm Douglas Griffin responded with... #

    Chris,

    There are some fairly gross generalisations in that post! I work exclusively in digital and don’t recognise many of the attitudes that you quote there – I’m sure I’m far from alone.

    Doug.

  34. On August 10, 2011 at 11:22 pm Chris responded with... #

    Doug, they may sound like general assumptions, however they are not intending to offend anyone. I have a mind and the freedom to express what I believe based upon evidence through online web forums, galleries and the like. If you work in digital thats fine, it works for you. If you can take an image, NOT muck around with it and print it straight from the camera then that surely is to be acknowledged. However – who does this? Not one person I know who has a digital camera works this way. If they did, they would all be shooting JPEG, or RAW and have no need for PS. But we all KNOW that the temptation to alter, take out, adapt, change or exaggerate is there. Its this very temptation to "alter" or in some cases even, destroy the photograph with manipulation is what makes digital photography the attraction to the thousands. Why do all digital photographers deny this? What Im saying is, take away that temptation given to digital users by using software, and concentrate on what is happening in front of them in the landscape, taking care and being patient for the decisive moment, surely would end up with more than a satisfying image? After all, if I and many others who use film can get a great photograph in one take, why cant some of those who use digital do the same? Simply because of two things; 1. The temptation to some how "invent, or make the image better" and 2. Because quality in the image is not on par with those rendered on film – digital users "have to" improve the image. In doing so, most, not all, but most, will then go on to invent colours, in the name of "creativity". Its not that creativity should be frowned on, far from it infact, its simply because the many who do this deny their "tweaks" and go on to say that this is what was seen. Its sad because I believe that the landscape is beautiful enough as it is. It needs no "inventions". This is why I use film. It challenges me to get it right, and if not, I go back for more. Its about being truthful to the landscape, the moment, and ones self…

    • On January 2, 2013 at 12:06 am Alastair responded with... #

      Chris,

      To take an image directly from a digital camera and print it would be like taking a negative and applying no contrast, spending no time dodging and burning and printing it exactly how it falls on the enlarger. No film photographer would do this. Why should a digital photographer limit themselves to what the camera stores?

      I shoot 95% film (actually closer to 100% now I only have an iPhone for digital capture) but the little digital photography I do, I use modern equivalents of traditional methods – dodging and burning and adjusting contrast using coloured filters.

      You’re making it out as if all digital photographers replace the sky or remove components of the scene!

      Ansel Adams made several versions of Moonrise, Hernandez all which were “tweaked”, “altered” and “exaggerated”.

      Manipulation of photographs have been going on since the dawn of photography, it’s just the tools have changed.

  35. On September 11, 2011 at 11:19 pm Tim Parkin responded with... #

    We’ve just had a lovely comment from a guy called ‘Randall Ponse Wander’ (a name that doesn’t appear in google or any personal search engines) who just threw various insults at Joe – I would normally post anything that comes through on the website but this particular comment had zero saving graces. No constructive personal opinion, no reasoning, no alternative suggestions – just a negativity. I invite Mr Randall Ponse Wander to resubmit a comment with a little more positivity. If you don’t like a particular photographer, just say you don’t like them and if you think other photographers deserve more attention, name a few of them and justify your choices. I now end this public services announcement..

  36. On January 11, 2012 at 11:37 pm Chris responded with... #

    Despite my own little nit-pickings, I think on the whole, considering it’s early days, I think youre doing well Tim. It’s going to take time to get into the swing of things, get more content, make contacts, review peoples work, etc etc. Its an aweful lot of background work to even present a few articles, collate, scrutinise, develop. Surely the whole point of the magazine was to invite landscape photographers to submit work, give ideas, offer advice, rather than just knock Tim for what he ‘hasn’t done. I hope Tim that you haven’t bitten off more than you can chew with this one, but keep going. With regards to some comments, I haven’t seen one advertisement or a 1000th article on how to use an ND grad…so thats one thing to be grateful for…eh OP ! :-D

  37. On July 10, 2012 at 4:15 pm Paul Breitkreuz responded with... #

    I’ve not visited your site in awhile and was pleasantly surprised to read this message about your new venture. Congratulations and good luck with this new and exciting plan.

    • On June 30, 2012 at 8:35 pm timparkin responded with... #

      Thanks Paul!

  38. On November 19, 2012 at 7:26 pm Russell Wilcox responded with... #

    This I believe to be long overdue. So many people of all abilities love to capture scenes that left an evocotive memory.
    The composition and light, be it water or a beautiful sunset, a vista withviews that inspire the sole.
    On a different note though I sadly have to agree with the comment made by someone else’s blog that most if not 90% of images taken are enhanced and do not display the scene that was..but..for sheer impact we crave for bolder more dazzling images hence the dawn of the digital camera..
    On a brighter note its wonderful to capture something that was truly breathtaking and very often the sky at sunset or dawn are so evocotive and dazzling it almost looks unreal and capturing that with alovely scene is art unto itself.. so.hey ho..

    Lookforward to the magazine and hopefully it will open to users to offer there images forward.

    Russell

  39. On August 12, 2013 at 6:44 am Chris Flees responded with... #

    Glad to hear your taking initiative here Tin. You are right most photo magazines recycle way too much material. Good luck on your endeavors.

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